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20121010
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CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm EDT
before on the 2004 race. i think i have one president, election in me. if we start a family, i would like to get one manufacture more presidential. she was okay with nap i had two candidates i liked. i asked to around people they didn't see al gore getting in. the other was john edwards. i liked john edwards at the time. and that didn't go -- there was a little bit of back and forth going on with that. and that didn't seem to be developing. so didn't look like anything was going to happen. there was one other candidates i liked. it was president obama. four years and a half years ago people back in the fall of 2006 would say things like, he's never going get elected there's no way america would elect a prime african-american you can't get elected with the name barack obama. it's actually didn't matter. i didn't know anybody in chicago. i didn't know anybody around the candidate. so it didn't look like anything was going to be happening. december 26, december 26, 2006 my wife and i were shopping day after christmas we were shopping in a borns and noble just up the road in california. my ph
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30pm EDT
will have, and, in fact, i welcome. a this is, we're told, the most i important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, o 2004, and 2000 or other 2 elections when00 that is regulay said. e for this to be true, though, among other things, elections must, in fact, be desicive with gene knew win consequences for the making of public policy, d particularly, with regard to domestic policy. we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regardea to foreign policy military policy, but let me say myto primary interest in the book ant in remarks this evening is much more domestic policy and the extent to which elections do ore do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic policy.es for the older members in this audience, there has been at t least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago when all of the stars were aligned, not only to create a landslide victory for johnson, after, all, richard nixon got a victory in 1972, but a lands
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had the chance to read the book, and without a doubt it's the best judicial biography that i've ever read. so
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
you will have, in fact, that i welcome. this is, we're told, the most important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, 2004 and 2000 or other elections when that is regularly said. for this to be true, though, among other things elections must, in fact, be decisive, with genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. um, we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy. but let me say that my primary interest in the book and in my remarks this evening is much more domestic policy, and can the extent to which elections do or do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic public policy. for the older members in this audience, there has been at least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago. when all of the stars were aligned not only to create a landslide victory for president lyndon johnson -- after all, richard nixon got a l
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm EDT
for the president's re-election effort is simply one word, forward. but not everyone thought it was catchy enough. so the vice president has apparently been floating some alternatives. >> age change only comes through challenge. i'm more optimistic about this country than i ever have been. not because of baraken. he can't do it. forget about your [bleep]. forget about all of it. so why the hell don't you go home. i don't quite get this. i'm so ashamed. [laughter] >> vice president biden was fired up at the naacp speech today. his second stem winder in a week. obama supporters praised those speeches. now it appears one show uncovered a new tour biden's starting. >> this summer, don't miss your chance to see america's funniest number two. joe biden, vp of comedy. >> those walls are often thin. i wonder how the hell my parents did it. that is different story. >> every laugh. >> barak says, three-letter word, j, o, b, s, jobs. >> every gaffe. >> god rest her soul and, although she is, your mom is still alive. it was your dad passed. god bless her soul. >> the joe biden vp of comedy tour. it will have
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am EDT
and election campaigns? >> the major effort has been going on for some time to come in various ways, to force business to back away from participating in both the election process and the process of governance. which loses sight of the fact that the constitution fundamentally guarantees us the right to petition the government, and the supreme court continues to support that right. and why do people want us not to do it? because for years, you know, people in business were reticent to, and then we started getting organized and now are all saying wait a minute, we didn't invite him to this party. we like our deal where we just make our arrangements and when our elections. well, good luck. it ain't happening. and american businesses are beginning to see that if they don't play any game, somebody else is going to steal their lunch. >> and that's a good think it is a good thing that american businesses are getting involved. i said earlier we do not have a clinical action committee at the nam but we are forming one. we had a debate for 40 years, and manufactures are very concerned about the future
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i t
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 2:00am EDT
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical societies and is a member of the advisory board for the curators of the 9/11 museum. as i mentioned before, he has taught me so very much and served as one of my most frequent sources for my documentary, looking for lincoln, my book lincoln on race and slavery and for a new film project, the african-americans many rivers to cross. it is my great honor and privilege to present this evening the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction to my friend and my teacher, david blight. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> my goodness. skip i actually just wanted to keep sitting there and let you keep going. i don't want to talk about the book. let's listen to skip. if i may borrow a word from isabella, suppose, what a beautiful word to start almost every line with. suppose there was a place that celebrated books, suppose there was a book award i
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
won't say yeah, we are right even in the best political climate after an election everyone is trying to be nice they can't make progress at the policy is so toxic they are not going to do with the problem. still downgrade. as we have to move past 2013 no matter what. you don't need causing the recession a threat to force us to move. in fact it is irresponsible to have the recession so we should get past the fiscal cliff, extend the ceiling and get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that will for ever get rid of the fiscal cliff and have a tax code and get rid of the sequestered because we know what the plan will be and that is the best way to go. >> so, the way we got here to the fiscal cliff is a bunch of the cans kept getting kicked down the road and happened to land right in front of us now at the end of december. if you look at cbo office of the fiscal plan if you notice the scary part is the pile of cans that happen to be in front of us right now. there's a good part of the cliff though and that is the part that stretches on throughout the rest of the ten year budget wind
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
in the 1960s during the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. and brosnahan said, look, he was a very well known and respected lawyer by then in san francisco. and buzz han said, i was there, i was the fbi agent on the -- >> host: who was discouraging black voters. >> guest: rehnquist was giving them a literacy test. >> host: right. >> guest: and, um, which was not illegal, but it was -- but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. >> guest: case of mistaken identity. >> host: so james brosnahan comes to washington, puts a lot on the line -- >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really gets hammered because in the end he's not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it, t just not me -- it's just not me. and that was very, very, i thought, cagey. it was very typical, i thought, when i met with rehnquist ten years later, um, very, very typical of the wa
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 6:00am EDT
legion's 94th national convention in indianapolis. where he was elected to serve as national commander. he brings a wealth of experience to this post. this includes his own service, united states army in vietnam, more than two decades in the private sector with mx coal country. his election as a county commission in worked county, indiana, and his service to veterans of our state as a member and president of the indiana veterans affairs commission. i'm confident the talent and diligence he has exemplified have been the hallmark of his career to date, and they will continue to will serve the american legion during his term of office. i would like to again thank the leadership and members of the respective veterans' affairs committee assembled here today for calling this important hearing. i wish jim and his wife, vicki, every success, and they're important service to the 2.4 million veterans that make up the american legion. and i look forward to learning much more about the american legion's important budget priorities, and supporting those in the future. i thank the chair. >> thank yo
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. and an incredible, beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening -- before we get to that, i have to start it was a joke. can i start out with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's the joke. [applause] followed by another joke, nancy pelosi. sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by friends of "saturday night live" but i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation, but i'm still waiting for that bet they are going to me and "saturday night live." he seemed to avoid goofy liberal spirits on the republicans they do over there. our first award to the evening is the obama got some award. i can't believe i'm actually saying that. troubling. for about 25 years come in the media research center has been documenting every idiocy we know from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say, the people we are going to be talking about, they love politicians who want to raise your taxes, right? they love politicians who want to expand the nanny state and are going to check all the boxes here. the
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
he was the senior senator from maine and mitchell was the elected leader, said he was older and was sort of a junior. when he and kaelin get together, i don't know. but they work together very closely in the senate just like being on opposite sides of the aisle and this is a photograph that shows them in collaboration during the act when mitchell had first been appointed to the senate he had been named the secretary of state and mitchell was appointed to fill his vacancy in 1980. in his early senate career his campaign literature shows mitchell on election night in 1982 the first year that he actually ran for the seat appointed for it was a tough campaign and he came out on top and send letters from strong thurmond who at the time was the secretary and the senate congratulate senator mitchell on his selection of what was his first election. we continue to get materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority l
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 6:00pm EDT
excited.' i was up there one time when they were having a national election that was practically a revolution. they threw out the party that was in power. they co--completely took off a party that had been there forever, practically disappeared. a whole new set of folks came in, and all the commentators were there on election night saying, 'now let's not get excited.' when they win the world series, instead of cutting up and going wild and people downtown honking and dancing the way they would in america, instead the canadians always go, 'this is quite wonderful, but let's not get excited.' c-span: later in that column you said, 'we're the country that put elvis on a stamp'--you--by the way, did you... >> guest: very proud of... c-span: ...did like elvis presley? >> guest: well, of course. c-span: 'we buy pink lemonade and striped toothpaste.' now i didn't think one of our favorite people would get it into this book, but here he is: '67. 2 percent of us believe that alexis de tocqueville never should have divorced blake carrington.' >> guest: what a great nation. what a great nat
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
contacts. this is a fun time, so the other up until election day. >> host: we look forward to learning more about it when the campaign is over. thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click done "after words" and the topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> the next three hours is your turn to tap with author and lecturer's even johnson, the best-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> gu
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am EDT
airplane you're more likely to be elected president of the united states than you are to die in a commercial airplane crash. the example i give kind of the set piece in the book is story of the miracle on the hudson. reminding my way to the, so they have right context. when the us air flight landed in the hudson and everyone survived i thought it was very telling how the media chose to cover this event. there are really two different ways they covered it. first was superhero pilot, captain sully who indeed was an amazing pilot and amazing job. there was this kind of language of the miracle on the hudson. almost like supernatural event that happened. when people didn't focus on nearly enough was the plane, the plane had, performed admirably during this, during this event and, it did so on a couple of levels. one when the geese collided with the jet engines they didn't explode, they didn't shatter, they didn't send of shard. is of titanium in the fuselage causing the plain to break down. that is because every single jet engine, every single model of a jet engine on aircraft is
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19